Shirley Temple, The Youngest, Most Sacred Monster of the Cinema in Her Time by Salvador Dalí—1939
Gouache, pastel, and collage on cardboard
29.5” x 39.5”
The painting depicts the child star Shirley Temple as a shinx. Shirley Temple’s head, taken from a newspaper photograph, is superimposed on the body of a red lioness with breasts and white claws. On top of the head is a vampire bat. Surrounding the sphinx are a human skull and other bones, suggesting her latest kill. At the bottom of the painting is a trompe-l’œil label that reads: “Shirley!. at last in Technicolor.”  The painting has been described as a satire on the sexualization of child stars by Hollywood.

Shirley Temple, The Youngest, Most Sacred Monster of the Cinema in Her Time by Salvador Dalí—1939

Gouache, pastel, and collage on cardboard

29.5” x 39.5”

The painting depicts the child star Shirley Temple as a shinx. Shirley Temple’s head, taken from a newspaper photograph, is superimposed on the body of a red lioness with breasts and white claws. On top of the head is a vampire bat. Surrounding the sphinx are a human skull and other bones, suggesting her latest kill. At the bottom of the painting is a trompe-l’œil label that reads: “Shirley!. at last in Technicolor.”  The painting has been described as a satire on the sexualization of child stars by Hollywood.

Uploaded on September 13 with 24 notes

Selected plates from the poetry of Thomas Gray, illustrated by William Blake—1797-1798

Uploaded on September 4 with 31 notes

Selected Plates from Edward Young’s Night Thoughts illustrated by William Blake—VERSION ONE

Uploaded on September 3 with 252 notes

Selected plates from Edward Young’s Night Thoughts illustrated by William Blake—VERSION TWO

Uploaded on September 3 with 15 notes
Kali is portrayed mostly in two forms: the popular four-armed form and the ten-armed Mahakali form. In both of her forms, she is described as being black in color but is most often depicted as blue in popular Indian art. Her eyes are described as red with intoxication, and in absolute rage, her hair is shown disheveled, small fangs sometimes protrude out of her mouth, and her tongue is lolling. She is often shown naked or just wearing a skirt made of human arms and a garland of human heads. She is also accompanied by serpents and a jackal while standing on a seemingly dead Shiva, usually right foot forward to symbolize the more popular Dakshinamarga or right-handed path, as opposed to the more infamous and transgressive Vamamarga or left-handed path.
(Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kali)

Kali is portrayed mostly in two forms: the popular four-armed form and the ten-armed Mahakali form. In both of her forms, she is described as being black in color but is most often depicted as blue in popular Indian art. Her eyes are described as red with intoxication, and in absolute rage, her hair is shown disheveled, small fangs sometimes protrude out of her mouth, and her tongue is lolling. She is often shown naked or just wearing a skirt made of human arms and a garland of human heads. She is also accompanied by serpents and a jackal while standing on a seemingly dead Shiva, usually right foot forward to symbolize the more popular Dakshinamarga or right-handed path, as opposed to the more infamous and transgressive Vamamarga or left-handed path.

(Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kali)

Uploaded on September 2 with 61 notes
A Friend’s Reunion by Max Ernst
Oil on canvas

A Friend’s Reunion by Max Ernst

Oil on canvas

Uploaded on August 26 with 46 notes

Four cosmic landscapes painted by Chesley Bonestell

Uploaded on August 26 with 40 notes

Visions of Jupiter’s inner and outer atmospheres

Uploaded on August 20 with 951 notes

Cosmic landscapes painted by Don Dixon

http://www.cosmographica.com/spaceart/index.html

Uploaded on August 12 with 198 notes

Paleontological paintings by Zdeněk Burian

Uploaded on August 6 with 204 notes
Farben-Kugel by Phillip Otto Runge, 1810
http://www.iscc.org/pdf/RungeFarben-Kugel.pdf

Farben-Kugel by Phillip Otto Runge, 1810

Uploaded on August 2 with 9 notes

Selected plates from the Theory of Colours by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, 1810

"Modern natural science sees darkness as a complete nothingness. According to this view, the light which streams into a dark space has no resistance from the darkness to overcome. Goethe pictures to himself that light and darkness relate to each other like the north and south pole of a magnet. The darkness can weaken the light in its working power. Conversely, the light can limit the energy of the darkness. In both cases color arises."

—Rudolf Steiner, 1897

Uploaded on August 2 with 327 notes
(Mercury Emerging from the Sea) Plate from Wunder-Materie by J.E. Muller, 1707
A modern coloration by Adam McLean
http://www.levity.com/alchemy/index.html

(Mercury Emerging from the SeaPlate from Wunder-Materie by J.E. Muller, 1707

A modern coloration by Adam McLean

http://www.levity.com/alchemy/index.html

Uploaded on July 31 with 219 notes
Plate from Magia Naturalis by Giambattista della Porta, Nuremberg, 1680
A modern coloration by Adam McLean
http://www.levity.com/alchemy/index.html 

Plate from Magia Naturalis by Giambattista della Porta, Nuremberg, 1680

A modern coloration by Adam McLean

http://www.levity.com/alchemy/index.html 

Uploaded on July 31 with 188 notes
Frontispiece to Lumen Novum Phosphoris Accensum by Heinrich Cohausen, Amsterdam, 1717
A modern coloration by Adam McLean
http://www.levity.com/alchemy/index.html

Frontispiece to Lumen Novum Phosphoris Accensum by Heinrich Cohausen, Amsterdam, 1717

A modern coloration by Adam McLean

http://www.levity.com/alchemy/index.html

Uploaded on July 31 with 18 notes